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birfSailing Fortuitousbirf
THIS IS THE BOAT LOG OR "BLOG" OF THE SAILING VESSEL FORTUITOUS.
This is a "play on words" because "blog" usually means "weblog" on the "internet," like a "log" on the "World Wide Web", and the last few letters of "weblog" looks like "blog"{not a real word}, but here it means "boat log" because this is the "Log" of a "boat" which is in this case a "sailboat."
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OTHER BLOGS "CLAIMING" TO BE THE BOAT LOG OF SAILING FORTUITOUS ARE IMPOSTERS IN DIRECT VIOLATION OF THE ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION AND PERPETUAL UNION.
- Aquarius 13:831 
SAILING | RACING | SAILING | OTHER


The Name

"Fortuitous" has been a fortuitous name for Fortuitous, which is the name of our boat. We did not name it Fortuitous ourselves, but the name has been fortuitous nonetheless.

for⋅tu⋅i⋅tous

Urban Dictionary defines "Fortuitous" as: adj. 1.(not defined)

Many scholars believe that "fortuitous" means 'fortunate' because it sounds like "fortune," and frankly, "who wouldn't like a 'fortune'!"? Of course, the fortune is on the wrong 'foot' in the case. In more "Latin-'ish'" languages, "forte" means chance. Also; by accident.

BACKWARDS?

Thusly, ''''fortuitous'''' means when things happen by chance. It might be a "lucky" chance. It might be "unlucky." The outcome could be good or bad, or somewhere in between. But the foruitous outcome is that it was random and without much (no) planning or particular design of intention. This is why everyone says the word wrong. Kids these days...!

  
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Sailing Fortuitous

How Do Sails Work?

Scientists still do not know exactly how sails work, but that hasn't stopped computers from "crunching the numbers." With today's computer animated drawing (CAD) programs, it is possible to spatially and temporally determine exactly how air and wind interact to propel sailboats and other sailing vessels to tremendous speeds: sometimes in excess of the actual air pressure. While your everyday sailsman can easily pull a few ropes and get a sailboat moving in the direction more or less of his or her choosing (some more than others), the actual process behind the process is even more fascinating than that.

First, it's important to understand the Bernoulli Principal. This theory states that when you blow over a straw, air is consumed, forcing pressure up. Obviously, sails are much larger than simple drinking straws, so imagine, if you will, a cardboard paper towel tube some 30 to 40 feet (98.5253 to 131.234 meters) tall, representing a sail. As air or wind are drawn over the top of the sail, the pressure is forced up, resulting in righting moment that can be converted into transactional lift via the keel. Let's ignore the keel for a moment (we can discuss hydrophylic attraction at a later time) and focus entirely on this paper towel tube. Don't believe me? Try this for yourself: Get a paper towel tube 30 to 40 feet (98.5253 to 131.234 meters) tall and blow across the top of it. The tones that you'll hear (not unlike when your father used to carefully blow across the top of a beer bottle, proclaim "Watch out, tug boat coming through," and then flatulate loudly) will be in the sub-liminal range, around <10Hz. The pressure will be moving at such a rate that it overcomes in the initial stability of the system, which could (back to keels again!) be converted into forward lift, moving a boat like a snake in a puddle.

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no tack requiredYawl


Hull Speed Explained

Hull Speed is one of the most oft misunderstood concepts of sailing. Most sailboat planforms are displacement hull vessels. At room temperature, water can not be compressed, so when a boat is placed in water, the water levels 'displace' by an amount proportionate to the vessel's draft. That water has to go somewhere, however, and tends to collect around the front of the boat, which is known as the "bow wave."

Without getting into too many forumulas, the height of this wave can be used to determine the length of the boat. A longer boat has more mass to suppress this wave, and when traveling forward has an easier time of climibing it using the concept of the inclined plane: a simple machine. This increases the overall length traveled, but the boat can go faster because there is less work to perform on the whole, depending on friction. Like a teeter-totter in reverse, this gives more massive sailboats a speed advantage equal to the square root of the constant.

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